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Crab Meat

Crab meat or Crabmeat is the meat found within a crab.  It is used in many cuisines across the world, prized for its soft, delicate taste. Blue Crabs (Callinectus sapidus), Blue Swimming Crabs (Portunus pelagicus), Red Swimming Crabs (Portunus haanii) are among the most commercially available species of crabmeat.

Grades
The meat of crabs comes in different grades, depending on which part of the crab's body it comes from and the overall size of the crab the meat is taken from.

Colossal
Colossal crab meat, also called Mega Jumbo Lump, is the largest whole unbroken pieces available from the blue crab and blue swimming crab.The colossal meat is taken from the two largest muscles connected to the back swimming fins of the crab. The lumps, or pieces, in the Colossal grade are bigger than those in the Jumbo Lump.

Jumbo lump
The jumbo lump grade crab meat comes from larger crabs, is the meat from the two large muscles connected to the swimming fins. Contrary to smaller portions of crab meat, it can be used whole. It has a brilliant white color and exquisite taste.

Lump
The Lump grade of crab meat is composed of broken pieces of Jumbo Lump, which are not included in the Jumbo Lump grade pack, and other flake pieces. This grade of crab meat is ideal for crab cakes and it is commonly used by manufacturers.

Special
The special meat is shreds and small flakes of white meat from the body cavity of the crab. It is generally used for all dishes in which white crab meat is used.

Back fin
The back fin portion consists of flakes of white meat, coming both from the special meat and the jumbo lump.

Claw
Claw meat is the dark pink meat that comes from the swimming fins and claws of the crab. It has a stronger taste, and is less expensive than the white color meat grades. It is often used in soups, where the strong taste comes through.

Claw Fingers
The Claw Fingers, also called Cocktail Fingers, are the tips of the pinchers, usually served whole, with the dark pink meat still in it. They are commonly used as garnish or hors d'�uvre.

Imitation
Imitation crab meat is widely used in America as a replacement for 100% crab meat in many dishes - popularly used in American sushi (eg califonia roll). Imitation crab meat contains a small percentage of crab meat.

The flaky, red-edged faux crab in your seafood salad or California roll is most likely made of Alaska Pollock. Also called Walleye Pollock, Snow Cod, or Whiting, this fish is abundant in the Bering Sea near Alaska and can also be found along the central California coast and in the Sea of Japan. Pollock has a very mild flavor, making it ideal for the processing and artificial flavoring of imitation crab. While Pollock is the most common fish used to make fake crab, New Zealand Hoki is also used, and some Asian manufacturers use Southeast Asian fish like Golden Treadfin Bream and White Croaker.

The processing of imitation crabmeat begins with the skinning and boning of the fish. Then the meat is minced and rinsed, and the water is leached out. This creates a thick paste called surimi. The word means "minced fish" in Japanese, and the essential techniques for making it were developed in Japan over 800 years ago. Surimi is commonly used in Japan to make a type of fish ball or cake called kamaboko. In 1975, a method for processing imitation crabmeat from surimi was invented in Japan, and in 1983, American companies started production.

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